All of my work reflects my interest in how people use space and place. In particular heterotopia, which is a concept used in human geography to describe places and spaces that function in non-hegemonic conditions.

Sue Beyer

Sue Beyer is an emerging artist based in Brisbane, Australia. In 2006, after a 10-year career as a graphic designer, Sue enrolled at the Queensland College of Art (QCA) to pursue fine art professionally. She’s now a full-time practising artist at her studio in Woolloongabba, Brisbane. Her first solo show in 2011 was helped to fruition by an Australia Council Art Start grant and this lead to her representation by Melbourne’s Gilligan Grant Gallery.

Sue Beyer, Dislocation #2, 2015

Sue Beyer, Dislocation #2, 2015

Sue Beyer, Dislocation #3, 2015

Sue Beyer, Dislocation #3, 2015

Sue is fascinated by architecture, mapping, urban design, philosophy and popular culture. We can see each of these exploding through in her work. The artist refers to town planning maps to interpret the restrictions of the natural topography, boundaries and spaces.

Sue Beyer, A shooting star, 2017

Sue Beyer, A shooting star, 2017

Sue Beyer, Undergrowth, 2012

Sue Beyer, Undergrowth, 2012

Maps as human thought on landscape

She likes the line and form that can be found in mapping. Sue also appreciates maps because they show how people tries to make order out of an essentially chaotic landscape. So she uses town planning maps to represent order, restrictions and boundaries imposed on the natural topography.

These artificial limits reflect on the economic value of the land and the type of people, housing and industry that can be found in these places. In contrast to the drawn planning lines, abstracted housing and landscapes represent people’s dreams, realities and aspirations that may exist in these physical or mental heterotopias.

In conclusion, Sue Beyer’s works are spaces of otherness. These fields are neither here nor there, that are simultaneously physical and mental. They recall an idyllic home – an escape – situated in a landscape that may not physically exist and is therefore nostalgically remembered from past experience. A dream or a yearned place seen in a lifestyle magazine.

Sue Beyer, Here there be monsters #1, 2015

Sue Beyer, Here there be monsters #1, 2015

Sue Beyer, Here there be monsters #4, 2015

Sue Beyer, Here there be monsters #4, 2015

Sue Beyer, Here there be monsters #3, 2015

Sue Beyer, Here there be monsters #3, 2015

Sue Beyer, Here there be monsters #2, 2015

Sue Beyer, Here there be monsters #2, 2015

Sources:

http://www.suebeyer.com.au

http://suebeyer.blogspot.it

http://www.designmontage.com.au

http://stevegray.com.au